Provide Basic Income That Supports America’s Artists

Target: President Joseph R. Biden, President of the United States

Goal: Establish a nationwide basic income program for artists.

Let’s be clear: everyone who makes under $18,000 a year would benefit greatly from a universal basic income (UBI). Pilot programs for UBI have already been tried in many cities and in various formats around the world, with successful results. Yet U.S. polls are divided about half and half as to whether to implement UBI. Reasons include doubting its sustainability, not trusting people to handle free money, and belief in a strong work ethic.

A compromise for a pilot program could be to give a basic monthly income to struggling artists. Since the pandemic closed theaters and concert halls, performing artists in particular have suffered a far greater unemployment rate than the general public. Recent surveys revealed that 81 percent of Americans believe the arts are “a positive experience in a troubled world,” but only 22 percent believe artists contribute “a lot” to society. In other words, Americans value art, but do not see artists as working. In truth, the work artists do is difficult to quantify, as it comes through the timeless realm of imagination.

A basic monthly income for artists would enable them to survive and focus on their own creative output. Everyone would benefit from the results. Candidates for the program could be identified by application to their state arts council, on the basis of excellence, promise, and need.

When given unconditional support, artists can make the world a more beautiful and amazing place with the manifestation of their powerful dreams. Please sign to ask President Biden to establish a basic income program for artists throughout the United States so that they can do their true work: inspiring humanity.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear President Biden,

Over 13% of Americans live in poverty. Universal basic income has been proposed and tried in various places on small scales, yet polls are divided on whether such a plan would be too risky nationwide. A more extensive pilot program could be a testing ground for the possibility of establishing a universal basic income program for all poorer people in the United States.

Recent surveys by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences revealed that 81 percent of Americans believe the arts are “a positive experience in a troubled world,” but only 22 percent believe artists contribute “a lot” to society. Artists are deeply motivated, exceptionally talented, highly skilled, and able to provide inspiration to a wide audience. Once ignited on a project, they tend to work nonstop with laser focus, regardless of compensation. Yet too often, the most groundbreaking artists by definition think so far ahead of the general populace that their gifts are not immediately valued. Many artists must produce their art on a shoestring budget, and those who also need to work at other jobs often suffer from depression and drained energy, diminishing their creative capacity.

A basic monthly income for artists would enable them to survive while focusing on their true work. Potential participants should be active artists of any media / genre who are not students, and could be identified by application to their state arts counsel. Qualifications would include artistic excellence, creative promise, and financial need.

As automation takes over more jobs, we no longer need to work at breakneck pace. Human hours are finally being freed to pursue joy and creativity. Artists could be an inspiring beacon, showing the rest of us a way forward. Please create a basic income program to support America’s artists.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Jonathon D.W. Smith


One Comment

  1. Frank Staples says:

    Why the hell do you idiots want the taxpayers to support “artists” who are obviously so untalented that they can’t support themselves?? Are you freaking serious?

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