Remove Images of Murder and Other Viral Violent Content From Social Media

Target: Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S/ House of Representatives

Goal: Hold social media companies accountable for unchecked spread of violent images and other inflammatory content.

Before the case of social media influencer Gabby Petito captured the nation’s attention, another young woman who spent much of her life on social media was allegedly murdered by a friend. When images of Bianca Devins’ lifeless body appeared on a social media platform shortly thereafter, viewers were first skeptical and then horrified after they learned that the pictures were real. The grotesque images, reportedly taken by Devins’ accused murderer, went viral…and were even sent to her family. Bianca’s grieving loved ones endured months of online harassment in the wake of the shocking events. These resilient individuals would eventually turn their grief into meaningful action and a potentially impactful legacy.

The recent revelations by a Facebook whistleblower demonstrates how social medial companies continuously put profit ahead of public welfare. Violent content, whether it be against humans or animals, lingers on the internet for far too long and often gains a twisted following. Bianca’s Law, a proposed bill backed by the Devins family and named in honor of their daughter, would charge all major social media corporations with creating an office devoted exclusively to rooting out and eradicating violent content before it gains a dangerous foothold and footprint online. These offices would be held strictly accountable for doing their jobs, with routine audits and powers granted to attorney generals to enforce the law and duly punish any lax behaviors.

Since first being introduced, however, this important piece of legislation has stalled. Sign the petition below to demand movement on a measure that could finally hold big tech giants who misuse their power and endanger public safety to account.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Speaker Pelosi,

Facebook has been in the hot-seat for ignoring and even encouraging destructive behaviors on its platforms. This social media giant is far from the only bad actor in the online world, however. Disinformation, terrorist recruiting, and violence-laden content now populate nearly every corner of social media. And far too often, these global influencers are slow to act in stopping the virulent spread of this dangerous content. Bianca Devins, whose murdered body was displayed for the world—and her family—to see, is one horrific example.

H.R.8323, otherwise known as Bianca’s Law, could help change this narrative. As the bill’s sponsor, Congressman Anthony Brindisi, aptly summarized: “our bill will hold big social media companies like Facebook and Instagram accountable for the spread of graphic content on their platforms, and if these companies don’t deliver, the FTC will step in and make them. It shouldn’t take intervention from a member of Congress to stop families from being terrorized with violent images of their daughter’s murder. After everything they’ve been through, the Devins family deserves to know that they, and any other family, will never face this kind of abuse ever again.”

These statements were made nearly a year ago, and in the meantime the accusations of the recklessness and carelessness of big tech giants have only multiplied. Congress has signaled its intent to hold these conglomerates more accountable, but the lack of action on this essential bill says otherwise.

Show the communities irreparably harmed that you mean what you say and that you stand in their corner, not in the hold of unregulated corporate kingpins. Please introduce Bianca’s Law to the floor for debate and a vote with expedience.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Brett Jordan


10 Comments

  1. Milantia Roy says:

    Someone said that technology was created by the devil – and it is true. Notice how pornography and violence are welcome because that is what makes social networks more profitable

    • patricia schwartzman says:

      I completely agree with you – the world is going through such a phase of decadence that it may already be the last of its end

      • jackie Pflucker says:

        Yes, believe it or not — Wars, crimes, perversion, cataclysms, all these are signs of the end of time, although there are very few who believe it and make fun of it

        • Wars crimes perversions cataclysms have always always been a part of the human conundrum it’s not your biblical end of times sign killing our planet is.

    • Back in the day, some were referring to it as The Beast.

  2. Linda Cummings says:

    Why is murder the best entertainment for Americans? This is a sign of a very sick society.

  3. This is a story that haunts many of us. Social Media can be a good thing but there is no oversight no matter what Facebook, YouTube and the others say. Add to this the fact they show videos of helpless puppies, kittens, and more being strangled by pythons and other snakes. Why is this so appealing to people. Crush videos are also shown. There is no need for this but the companies are making money off these videos and thus allow this horror to continue. No person needs to be shown DEAD of social media. No child bees to be bullied so much as to try to kill themselves and many times effectively so. When did human beings become so deranged and companies with no oversight and no concern except for the bottom line? Companies such as this should not exist, or when discovered the fines should be so outrageous that the company is made to suffer their losses.

  4. REMOVE THE ANIMAL ABUSE FROM SOCIAL MEDIA AND PROSECUTE AND STOP THOSE THAT DO IT.

  5. Why is murder the most popular kind of entertainment in the United States? This is a symptom of a seriously ill society.

  6. Social media and messaging platforms are de facto regulators of online speech and therefore key decisionmakers in combating online influence operations. While many nations have laws regulating internet content, platforms have substantial autonomy and responsibility to draw their own lines between acceptable and unacceptable content. In recent years, major platforms have begun maintaining public “community standards”—written policies on a wide range of problematic activity like squid game games, violence, and influence operations.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

1365 Signatures

  • Jolene Headrick
  • sarah weisberg
  • Dakotah Woller
  • Kristi Grosse
  • Ana Oliveira
  • Jerusalem Wise
  • Carlos Otero
  • Cecilia Lalinde
  • Bill Sykes
  • Dr. Stacey McRae
1 of 137123...137
Skip to toolbar