Stop Overdevelopment of Connecticut Small Town

Bethany, CT

Target: Bethany Planning and Zoning Vice-Chairman Mary J. Shurtleff.

Goal: Prevent the proposed zoning changes in Bethany, Connecticut.

Nestled near the center of the county of New Haven within Connecticut, the town of Bethany prides itself on the rural small town feel that it provides its 5,563 residents. The town has even made “Rural is Beautiful” into the official town motto. Unfortunately, the desires of developers threaten to impact the peaceful community’s quiet, rural atmosphere by seeking zoning changes that would begin to push Bethany toward urban expansion.

If this zoning change, which would establish an “open space housing district” within the town, were to come to pass, it would open Bethany to housing developments, condominiums, and additional zoning changes aimed at increasing the number of dwellings per acre. The proposed zoning regulation change would allow any builder or developer to construct higher density housing as long as the site is 20 acres or more. The desire to alter the zoning standards of the town come not from Bethany’s own constituency but rather from developer pressure stemming from nearby cities and towns that are already expanding beyond their own respective capacities.

It would be a travesty to transform a town that has enjoyed a tranquil and low-key environment for nearly 400 years into another example of urban sprawl. The historic beauty of Bethany, a town first inhabited in 1638, cannot be allowed to fall victim to outside influences. The current zoning regulations should be maintained as they serve to not only safeguard public health and safety, but also the rural character the town prides itself on. Bethany must be allowed to remain the quiet rural town it has for so long striven to be, and the only way this will be accomplished is by not changing any of the long-existing zoning regulations within the town.

Lend your voice to stop these potentially devastating zoning changes.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Vice-Chairman Shurtleff,

Within its idyllic location of central New Haven County, the town of Bethany has long prided itself on a rural small town feel. This town’s 5,563 residents have chosen to live in a place that embraces “Rural is Beautiful” as its official town motto for a reason. This reason runs entirely contrary to the wishes of developers seeking to break the community’s peacefully rural atmosphere. These developers are pushing Bethany towards urban expansion by seeking zoning changes that could mar the city forever.

These zoning changes, which would establish an “open space housing district” within the town, will open Bethany to an array of housing developments, condominiums, and additional zoning regulations aimed at increasing the number of dwellings per acre. These developer-fueled changes would allow any builder or developer to construct higher density housing as long as the site is at least 20 acres. These developers who are pressuring for zoning changes do not come from within Bethany’s borders, but rather originate from nearby cities and towns that are already expanding beyond their own respective capacities.

Allowing this change to the township’s zoning regulations would be a travesty. This town has enjoyed its low-key atmosphere for centuries. Bethany’s roots date all the way to 1638 when the area was first occupied. It has maintained its small town status ever since then and should not lose this to outside influences. The existing zoning regulations must be maintained to not only safeguard public health and safety, but also to retain the character Bethany prides itself on. Bethany must be allowed to remain the quiet rural town it strives to be. The only way this can be accomplished is by not changing any of the long-existing zoning regulations within the town.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

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