Urge the FDA to Limit Sugar Levels in Soda

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Target: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Goal: Limit dangerous amounts of high-fructose corn syrup that are added to soft drinks

The Center for Science in the Public Interest recently professed the dangers of unsafe levels of high-fructose corn syrup that are commonly added to soft drinks in the United States. With the support of public health departments across the nation, the Center is urging the FDA to determine safe levels of added sugars for all beverages.

The strategy to limit American’s increasing intake of sugar is motivated by the equally increasing frequency of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other related health problems that are direct results of a high-sugar diet. In addition to determining the levels of sugar that can be safely added to drinks, urge the FDA to also ensure that the beverage industry abides by adding only safe amounts of sugar.

The bulk of the problem is that many Americans are unaware that their consumption of soft drinks and other beverages loaded with high-fructose corn syrup do, in fact, provide them with twice their daily recommended intake of sugar. The average bottle of soda contains a whopping 16 teaspoons of it, an amount the American Heart Association deems hazardous.

Even lower-calorie diet sodas , if consumed on a regular basis, can have harmful effects due to the increased levels of sugar added to them within the past few years. As a result, the FDA must step in and place regulations on the beverage industry in order to protect unknowing citizens from drinking themselves to disease.

Because high-fructose corn syrup has been added in increasing amounts to sodas like Pepsi and Coke, moderate soda drinkers are at risk as well as over-indulgers. If the beverage industry wishes to sell a harmful product, then their consumers deserve to know the dangers of drinking it.

Because the beverage industry is not likely to place a kind of surgeon general’s warning on their labels, it would be better to simply decrease and regulate the excessive amounts of sugar that are put into soft drinks. Urge the FDA to step in and limit the amounts of high-fructose corn syrup that are being added to beverages.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Food and Drug Administration (FDA),

Due to the recent increase of high-fructose corn syrup being added to soft drinks in the United States, and in consideration of their harmful effects, I urge you to determine safe levels of sugars that should be added to beverages, and then ensure that the beverage industry abides by these regulations instead of using excessive amounts of sugar to sweeten soft drinks.

Because many Americans have been consuming soda for a long time, they are unaware that levels of added sugar are increasing and that the beverages they used to drink are now significantly more harmful to their health.

These beverages are so harmful that one bottle of soda contains twice the amount of daily sugar  intake recommended by the American Heart Association, and many Americans consume more than just one bottle per day. As a result, our country is seeing a steady increase of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and numerous other health problems that can be directly attributed to excessively sugared drinks. Please help reduce disease and poor health in this country by determining safe levels of high-fructose corn syrup and also by ensuring that the beverage industry is not polluting drinks with unsafe amounts of sugar.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Futurity.org

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One Comment

  1. These drinks continue to destroy the health of those who consume them. They should be off the market altogether.

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