Support Offshore Wind Energy in Maryland

Offshore Wind Turbine

Target: U.S. Department of Energy

Goal: Support a Maryland bill promoting the state’s use of renewable offshore wind energy.

A wind power bill, sponsored by Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, is now in its third year in the state’s House of Representatives. If passed, the bill would require a percentage of Maryland’s electricity to come from offshore wind farms. Support the passage of this bill so Maryland can make use of more emissions free energy, helping to keep our natural environment clean.

Wind power backers began to officially make their case for the bill this year on February 5th, 2013. The offshore wind farms would help to prevent unnecessary carbon dioxide emissions while producing well-paying jobs. Opponents fear that the bill will come at a high cost to citizens and businesses. There is significant support on both sides of the issue. “We are very excited for the opportunity this bill brings to our state,” said president of Alpha Energy, Marcellous Butler. Alpha Energy is a Maryland organization that integrates community involvement into its wind and solar developments.

Normal utility customers would not have to pay a dime until the turbines are up and running. From then on, the average residential customer would only have to pay an extra $1.50 per month. Most of the opposition comes from retail customers. Business owners could end up having to pay 1.5 percent more each month. Advocates of the bill remind these companies that the wind energy proposal would be good for their businesses, generating jobs in a growing field.

The governor’s top energy advisor, Abigail Cooper, said that passing the bill would send a strong signal “that Maryland is in this game.” EDF Renewable Energy, a leader in wind and solar development with a portfolio of over 70 renewable projects in 17 states, believes that offshore wind for the state is feasible. Doug Copeland, regional development manager for the company, told lawmakers that the project “has some legs to it.”

Offshore wind would be a great sustainable development for Maryland. It would contribute to solid renewable energy generation while avoiding carbon dioxide pollution into the atmosphere. It would help to create many new local jobs. The state’s own governor has been supporting the idea for three years. Help out Maryland’s governor, the environment, and the residents of the state by signing this petition asking the U.S. Department of Energy to support this wind power bill.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Department of Energy,

The state of Maryland is trying to pass a renewable energy bill pushing for the use of offshore wind power. The bill would require that a certain percentage of the state’s power be derived from offshore wind as a sustainable energy source. Impact on citizens would be minimal. The average residential utility customer would only have to pay an extra $1.50 each month, and only after the turbines are up and running. The legislation has the support of Maryland’s governor and multiple energy organizations. The project is feasible.

Passing this bill would generate new local jobs through the construction and operation of new facilities. It would prevent the unnecessary emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. It would set a strong foundation in Maryland for the use of sustainable energy. I urge you to support the passage of Maryland House Bill 226 and Senate Bill 275 in order to help keep our natural environment safe and clean.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Nuon via Flickr

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