Demand Equal Pay for Equal Work

Target: Mick Mulvaney, Director of the White House Office of Management and Budget

Goal: Reinstate tools that ensure companies offer their employees fair compensation.

10 years and half a million dollars: these are not prison sentences or court settlements, but in a fundamental way these numbers have the same impact. The first number represents the average additional number of years a working woman in the United States would need to stay employed in order to equal her male counterparts’ lifetime salaries. The second number is the average amount of money lost over a woman’s entire career. The institutions and laws meant to close America’s wage gap are not strengthening, however. They are being systematically gutted.

Unequal pay is not relegated to a specific occupation, region, or race. Hollywood stars and physicians face the same pay disparities as customer service workers and manual laborers. Regardless of ethnic background, women as a whole make just 80 cents for every man’s dollar. For women of color, these discouraging statistics can drop as low as 50 cents per dollar. Congress enacted the Equal Pay Act to provide women legal avenues for seeking the pay they deserve, but this law can only serve its full effectiveness through strong support and strict enforcement. Recently, the Trump administration rolled back a key provision that requires large companies to report their employees’ earnings to necessary departments. These reports ensure that comparisons in pay can be factually evaluated. This rollback blindsided advocacy groups and earned swift reprisal.

The setback is only the latest in a troubling year for Equal Pay for Equal Work advocates. Watchdog groups have also expressed deep reservations, once again, about government appointees with questionable experience and credentials. In this case, the controversial appointees are key players at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Advocates are currently fighting back against the data disclosure rollback with a lawsuit. Sign this petition and demand the Office of Management and Budget immediately restore a vital tool for securing equal pay for all workers.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Director Mulvaney,

If you worked your entire life to achieve a goal and took all the necessary steps to make your ambition a reality, how would you feel if someone offered you 80 percent of your sought-after reward? How would you feel if your friend, who took the very same steps as you or perhaps even took a few steps fewer, received the full reward?

For working women across the country, this is not a hypothetical but a harsh reality. As it stands now, when a male retires with a comfortable income in his 60s, a woman would have to work well into her seventies to garner the same benefits. Our government should have and did instill safeguards against this abusive system with the Equal Pay Act.

Yet in the past year, our government essentially neutralized this safeguard by needlessly dropping a critical regulatory provision that holds companies to account for their pay disparities. Eliminating equal pay data collection may have helped ‘deregulate’ companies and advance executive business interests, but this maneuver in turn struck a hard blow to the employees that truly sustain our economy.

Restore this provision today and restore the integrity of the Equal Pay Law.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Nick Ares

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2 Comments

  1. Gen Agustsson says:

    fair wages or else!

  2. Equal pay for all! Not more for men!

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