Encourage Opti-Free to Reduce Plastic Waste with Contact Lens Solution Dispensaries

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Target: Kevin J. Buehler, Division Head, Alcon

Goal: Reduce plastic waste by setting up contact solution dispensaries in eyeglass and drug stores

It’s no secret that plastic waste is a global concern. We are encouraged to “reduce, reuse and recycle” in order to cut back on plastic waste. But contact lens wearers don’t have the option of reducing their consumption of contact solution. They also can’t reuse the bottle and the recycling process emits toxic chemicals into the air and ground. So, what’s the solution (no pun intended)? To reduce plastic waste, Opti-Free needs to implement contact solution dispensaries in eyeglass and drugstores.

Statistics on how much plastic waste is created by contact lens wearers is hard to find. However, any person who wears contact lenses knows how many contact solution bottles they throw out each year. With approximately 38 million contact wearers in the U.S. consuming one to two bottles of contact solution a month, around 912 million empty bottles are being either recycled or thrown out every year.

Adding to the waste is the fact that contact case reservoirs have increased in volume over the years, sometimes by as much as 189%. This means that contact lens wearers need even more contact solution than in prior years in order to fill up the case reservoirs. The purpose of increasing lens case reservoirs is questionable. But one thing is certain: the larger size increases sales of contact lens solution, thereby increasing plastic waste.

Much of our plastic waste consumption can be reduced if we have the opportunity to refill bottles with products we use regularly. Some makers of laundry detergent, soaps and house cleaning products have already begun to set up dispensaries in select stores. As one of the top-selling contact solution manufacturers, Opti-Free is in a position to lead the market in environmentally responsible practices. Implementing contact solution dispensaries would encourage brand loyalty, repeat business for stores providing the service and it would significantly reduce the amount of plastic waste accumulated each year.

Please sign this petition to encourage Opti-Free to take this revolutionary step in protecting our environment.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Kevin J. Buehler,

Each year, contact lens wearers may be disposing of close to one billion empty bottles of contact solution. With plastic waste being a growing concern for the planet, it is imperative that businesses who use plastic packaging find new alternatives.

Some makers of laundry detergent, soaps and other cleaning products have begun setting up dispensaries where customers can refill bottles with their favorite products. Opti-Free can follow their lead by implementing contact solution dispensaries in eyeglass and drugstores. This is an opportunity for Opti-Free to encourage brand loyalty and repeat business to stores providing the service and, most importantly, significantly reduce plastic waste.

With contact lens wearers using more solution than in prior years due to increases in the volume of contact case reservoirs, the number of bottles of solution being thrown out is growing. We urge you to help reduce plastic waste by implementing contact solution dispensaries in eyeglass and drugstores.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Lee J. Haywood via Flickr.

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One Comment

  1. Opti-Free could set an example for not only other contact solution manufacturers, but manufacturers of all products that come in plastic containers.

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