Stop Greece’s ‘Ghost Dog’ Epidemic

Target: Prokopis Pavlopoulos, President of Greece

Goal: Stop mass dog abandonment epidemic in Greece.

Millions of dogs are dying alone and abandoned on the streets of Greece. Due to the country’s financial crisis, owners cannot afford to care for their pets, leading them to leave these innocent animals to fend for themselves in a dangerous rural area. Many of these dogs die, suffering horribly in their last moments, and the survivors are referred to as ‘ghost dogs’ due to their appearing and disappearing when rescue workers come to feed them.

The rescue workers are making every effort to help the survivors and find them new homes, but that is only the beginning. This mass abandonment of innocent dogs is unacceptable. If owners are unable to properly care for their dogs, the responsible thing to do is to leave them at a shelter or find them a new home where they will be safe and protected. Abandonment is a form of animal cruelty on par with abuse.

Dogs deserve better than to die cold, alone, and starving in the streets. Sign this petition to demand this epidemic of dog abandonment be stopped as soon as possible.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear President Pavlopoulos,

Millions of ‘ghost dogs’ are starving in the streets of Greece, many of them dying alone and in pain, due to mass abandonment by their owners. People who cannot afford to care for their dogs due to the current financial crisis leave the animals to fend for themselves in a dangerous rural area, instead of doing the responsible thing and leaving them at a shelter or finding them a more suitable home.

Rescue workers are doing their best to help the survivors, but that is only the first step. Abandonment of animals is just as cruel as abuse, and this disturbing trend needs to be stopped. Owners must practice responsibility when it comes to these innocent creatures, rather than leaving them to suffer and die alone. You must strengthen your animal protection laws and criminalize this abandonment. Ensure that the ‘ghost dog’ epidemic is stopped as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: kstrzeminska

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14 Comments

  1. Barton Dixon says:

    “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” Mahatma Gandhi

    “If a man aspires towards a righteous life, his first act of abstinence is from injury to animals.” Albert Einstein

    “Compassion for animals is intimately connected with goodness of character; and it may be confidently asserted that he who is cruel to animals cannot be a good man.” Authur Schopenhauer

    “If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men.” St. Francis of Assisi

  2. Annica Eriksson says:

    This is appalling, if you are able to feed youtrself and have a roof over your head you must be able to take care of your dog and share your food.
    Compassion and empathy for animals has nothing to do with Money. But I guess greeks lack of it =(

  3. At the end of the day, after all your troubles in life all what you will need will be a LOVING FRIEND BEING.
    No money and mostly no human will give you such love as animals can give. When everybody will live you, loving animal will stay with you to the end and forEVER. Unconditional Love comes from animals so take care of them gently because they are angels on this planet.

  4. HELP THE GREAT ANIMALS OF GREECE .

  5. Jambrina Sakellaropoulo says:

    Greeks (not all thank G-d) are very unenlightened where animals are concerned. They poison cats and dogs for fun! At the same time, they always make the sign of the cross when passing a church…. Cruelty to all animals abounds in Greece. I attribute this appalling behavior to the lack of home training. Cruelty (and fear) passes down from generation to generation. Even imported major dog and cat food from the US is inferior quality to what we buy here. Why? Because no one complains, they simply don’t care! My Vet in Greece told me of this. My dog was in an enclosed yard when he was fed rat poison! Luckily I was able to save him with 8 shots a day!! Animals are terribly abused. They are rarely treated as members of a family and that’s why they are so easily abandoned. It is a heart breaking situation. There are a few people in Greece who DO care and try to save animals with no funds to support their efforts. They desperately need money. Sadly, the government doesn’t help at all!

  6. Greece has some of the toughest animal cruelty laws on earth, but they are not enforced, so people keep their dogs on chains outside, as burglar alarms, often with little or no shelter in 100 degree heat, and table scraps if they are lucky. Sometimes they get water. They are never taken to a vet. People from the bigger cities have summer houses and take a puppy in for the summer as a plaything for their kids or an alarm. Come fall, they let them loose to fend for themselves. They have no ID’s and and are left to starve and breed, bringing more puppies into the world to die of starvation or disease. Many of the dogs are beaten, or poisoned. Many are hit by cars and left to die. I have spent a lot of time in Greece and know first hand. There are people who sacrifice so much to take care of the “street dogs”, with makeshift shelters. These people do without, so that they can help animals.
    They drive around bringing food to the dogs where they find them.
    I have been with them and seen the situation.

  7. Karin Johansen says:

    When I look at my 5 former Greek stray dogs and 3 cats I am thankful that they are no longer living on the streets. The strays of Greece are not only faced with starvation and cold but also a lot of other dangers for example poison.

  8. Anna Kolovou says:

    It is really disappointing to see such a false an inaccurate petition on here.

    First of all the crisis was exaggerated by the press. .If you went there you couldn’t tell there was a crisis…..people tried hard to go about their lives and yes banks were a mess but it was NOT so bad to the point that people didn’t have food on their table or couldn’t care for their pets.

    I have tons of friends and family in Greece in the middle or low class,and they would rather starve than let go of their dogs ,and leave them on the streets.

    We do have strays but that was not because of the crisis,it is a general situation.There are many people who care for them and feed them.

    Having lived both in The States and in Europe i have to say that animal abuse is waaaaaay worse in America.From hoarders,to neglect and starvation to physical abuse and killings.
    Not to mention rescues who end up in kill shelters something we would never implement in Greece.

    I sign your petitions on here (Animal petitions and Forcechange) every single day……but now this made me wonder how accurate or exaggerated the rest of the petitions are.

    Please do some research before you post a petition and make sure you don’t get your info from the corrupt press.

  9. Maybe there are enlightened people in Greece where animals are concerned,
    But the majority are not. If anything, this petition is under exaggerated.
    The situation only gets worse daily, as more are puppies are born and subsequently die in the fields and in the streets, with people passing them by,
    without feeling anything.

  10. Who is your God Greece? Does he have horns?

  11. Lisa Allred Lisa Zarafonetis says:

    Signed & shared❗️😠

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