Tell State Farm to Provide More Comprehensive Insurance

state farm

Target: State Farm Insurance CEO and Chairman, Edward B. Rust, Jr.

Goal: Start providing more reliable insurance to customers.

Recently, an 83-year-old man died in a car crash, yet strangely, not as a result of the car crash. He was going less than five miles an hour and was within a stone’s throw of his home in Mercer Island, Washington. The man suffered a massive and fatal heart attack while driving, causing his car to veer into a neighbor’s vehicle. The damages to the other car were only about $500, a sum that State Farm, the deceased’s insurance provider, could have easily paid. However, the company is refusing to do so, stating that because the heart attack was largely unforeseen and not the deceased’s fault, it will not pay for the damages.

If the heart attack had been in any way the man’s fault, State Farm would fulfill its duties as his insurer, yet because he was the victim of foul luck, State Farm says that the collision he was involved in is none of its business. State Farm provides auto insurance—car collisions are most certainly its business. State Farm’s policy dictates it needs only pay for damages when the driver is at fault, so if a car is damaged in a natural disaster, it is not the company’s problem. In this case, an elderly man dying at the wheel of his car is not the company’s problem either. State Farm is charging its customers every month, yet does not seem to be guaranteeing them anything.

This equates to little more than fraud; the vehicles that the company claims to insure only seem to actually be insured when State Farm wants them to be. It is time for consumers to be made aware of this policy. Sign the petition and tell State Farm that it is high time for it to fulfill the promises it has made to its clients and provide them with real, reliable insurance.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Rust,

People do business with State Farm Insurance every day, but when people buy insurance, it is more than just a business transaction, it is an exchange of trust. Your customers put their trust in State Farm in the hope that your company will come to their aid when they are involved in automobile accidents. However, you recently betrayed that trust when you declined to cover a claim made on behalf of a man who had a heart attack while driving.

The man, an elderly resident of Washington, was going approximately five miles per hour when he suffered a fatal heart attack, causing his car to careen into a parked car. The damage totaled only $505, a sum that State Farm can certainly afford. However, the exact cost is beside the point.

The fact that you will not cover the damage because this accident was not the driver’s fault is ludicrous. If he had driven against a doctor’s advice you would cover the claim, but because he suffered a random and fatal misfortune, you will not. This aspect of your company’s policy is absurd and must be changed. This man and his family assumed that State Farm would be there for them. When that time came, you were nowhere to be found. State Farm needs to do its job and provide insurance when people actually need it, not just when it is convenient for you.

People pay money every month for years on end in the hope that State Farm will help them if they are involved in an accident. This recent incident makes it clear that State Farm will not be of help. I hope that you read this, Mr. Rust, and reconsider this policy.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: State Farm via Flickr.

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One Comment

  1. Why have insurance if they don’t want to pay for claims?

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