Say No to Airline Rule that Separates Families During Flight

american

Target: American Airlines

Goal: Repeal rule that forces passengers to pay to be seated next to family and friends

A new rule now enforced by American Airlines isn’t helping their already poor reputation in regards to customer service. In addition to paying extra fees for carry-on luggage, luggage weight, as well as food and change fees, consumers are now forced to dish out extra money just to sit next to their family and friends.

The airlines are now requiring a paid-in-advance fee of sixty dollars to guarantee customers that they will be seated next to each other. Many flyers who had already purchased their tickets for vacations and get-aways found themselves forced to choose between their kids and the fee.

This new rule is preposterous for several reasons. Supposedly, the fee was enacted because planes are filling up faster and it is becoming increasingly difficult to accommodate seating requests. However, if sixty dollars can immediately fix the problem, then the problem is likely not large enough to demand a fee.

Parents who pay the money upfront are immediately assured seating next to their children, yet others are not displaced from their seats because of it. Airlines are more than capable of providing consumers with consecutive seats as there are enough single flyers to fill in the seat gaps. This charge is just another way to take advantage of customers who require airline service.

The rule also places children in potential harm. If it becomes accepted airline protocol to separate parties during flights, airlines could be a new target for predators that are given easier access to unaccompanied children. This is a concern for any traveling parent, and airlines should be responsible enough to ensure as safe an environment as possible for its customers.

To separate traveling parties does not accomplish this goal. It also gives customers cause for worry, especially “nervous flyers” or claustrophobics who already feel uncomfortable soaring thousands of feet above ground. Their only source of comfort may be a friendly hand to hold.

Tell American Airlines to repeal this new rule immediately. It is an unfair way to charge customers money for a service that should be a mandatory provision. It places children in potential harm and only serves to aggravate the traveling process for those who are not comfortable flying.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear American Airlines,

The new fee you are charging your customers is unfair and ridiculous, and forcing parents to pay just to sit next to their children is a serious problem. Airlines could become a new place for predators to approach children if separating parties becomes airline protocol. If children are consistently separated from their parents and left unsupervised, they are in potential danger.

The rule is also unfair because many of your customers are “nervous flyers” or suffer from claustrophobia. To force them away from a family member or friend just because they do not wish to pay your company a fee is depriving them of the only consolation they may have during travel. This is preposterous. I demand that you repeal this rule at once and give your customers back their basic traveling comforts.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Google Images

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One Comment

  1. Laura Heintz says:

    I wanted to let you know that most airlines are now doing this. You can find a petition I started to reintroduce and pass a Families Flying Together Act.

    http://www.causes.com/causes/809392-reintroduce-and-pass-h-r-6124-families-flying-together-act-of-2012/actions/1721270

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