Investigate Toxic Chemical Exposure in Veterans

Target: Members of Congress

Goal: Investigate and provide resources for veterans exposed to toxic chemicals while serving at Fort McClellan.

Veterans who served at Fort McClellan between 1935 and 1999 were potentially exposed to toxic chemicals, compromising their health and sometimes leading to death. The Fort McClellan Health Registry Act would require the Veterans Administration (VA) to investigate claims, and subsequently provide resources for exposed vets. Please sign this petition and urge Congress to pass the Fort McClellan Health Registry Act, which would provide care for veterans experiencing health problems as a result of their exposure to toxins at Fort McClellan during service.

Fort McClellan, or “Fort Mac”, was a US Army post located adjacent to the city of Anniston, Alabama. Years of dumping, improper containment, and toxic chemical spills exposed veterans and their families to a cocktail of depleted Uranium, sarin gas, mustard gas, Agent Orange, and various other bacterial, nerve and chemical agents. After funding was appropriated for specialized training, Fort Mac became the only chem/bio facility in the Army where live substances were manufactured, stored, and used in training. Recent testing reported chemical agents in concentrations of up to 55,000 times established safe levels. Veterans having served time at Fort Mac have dealt with a slew of freakish and unexplainable health issues that are now thought to be the result of toxic exposure. Fort McClellan was home to an average population of about 10,000 military personnel and their families.

Rep. Paul Tonko introduced the Fort McClellan Health Registry Act in an effort to investigate the health of soldiers who trained at Fort McClellan. The proposed law would require the VA to create a database of veterans who served at Fort Mac and their health issues to scientifically determine if exposure to toxic chemicals compromised their health. The VA would also be required to provide health exams, care resources, and education and research on chemical exposure. Once a link is established between serving at Fort McClellan and significant health problems, the VA will have to provide care to the veterans who obviously need and deserve it.

Please sign this petition and urge members of Congress to pass the Fort McClellan Health Registry Act, and confront the health issues of our service members unknowingly exposed to chemical toxins.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Members of Congress,

Fort McClellan in Anniston, Alabama was one of the largest U.S. Army Posts during World War II; serving as home to an average population of about 10,000 military personnel. Unfortunately, service members and their families stationed at Fort Mac were exposed to a number of toxic chemicals between 1935 and 1999. The Fort McClellan Health Registry Act would require the Veterans Administration (VA) to investigate veteran health issues correlated to time at Fort Mac, and then provide resources and subsequent health care once a link was established. I urge you to support the bill in an effort to provide necessary health care to past and future soldiers unknowingly exposed to toxins while serving.

As a site for chemical warfare training, Fort McClellan was the only chem/bio facility in the Army where live substances were manufactured, stored, and used in training. Veterans and their families were exposed to the “McClellan Cocktail”, including depleted Uranium, sarin gas, mustard gas, Agent Orange, and various other bacterial, nerve, and chemical agents. Since serving time at Fort Mac, veterans have reported a laundry list of odd health issues that are now thought to result from toxic chemical exposure.

The Fort McClellan Health Registry Act would require the VA to compile the necessary data to first establish a link between Fort McClellan veterans and the freakish health disorders they face, as well as provide the medical attention and support needed to combat illnesses. It is your duty to care for returning soldiers injured in the line of duty, especially when inflicted by the US.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: susankatzkeating.com via Yahoo

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57 Comments

  1. Gilbert R. Ford says:

    I attended Ft. McClellan numerous times, Basic Training, AIT, MP Basic, MP Advanced and Drill Sergeant School beginning in 1978. I am all too familiar with Pelham Range. I have been having these similar health issues for awhile. Hopefully, they (Congress and the VA) will do something. God Bless all those who have served and those who have passed.

  2. Stationed at Ft. Mac in 1979 for MP training. Now some 37 years later having GI issues, chronic fatigue, and other health issues, not to mention PTSD, depression, anxiety. Only just heard about this through a FB group.

  3. Charles Hornung says:

    1987 E 787 MP. Got my first pace maker when I was 31. Pulips removed when 33. Tonsils grew extra lobes (Dr never seen anything like it). Currenty in appeals process with va. When I started the claims process like many of you brothers in arms nobody such as legion or dva knew what I was talking about.(about Ft. Mac) So I got a lawyer. Even my lawyer was very skeptical early on. I got the Lawyer specifically because the Va said they didnt have to recognize my claim because there wasnt a law stating they had too. I really didnt expect that. This was around 2010. I have now reached 40percent. None of it a Ft monmouth specific. But with the 40 the va now treats me for the pacemaker and the skin condition. And my last pulips were removed at the Fargo ND VA. I would like to know if there are more Ft. Mac soldiers with pacemakers.

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