Stop Industrial Expansion into Australia’s Protected Barrier Reef Port

Aerial of the Great Barrier Reef

Target: Head of the Gladstone Ports Corporation, Leo Zussino

Goal: Halt the construction of the highly destructive liquid natural gas export platform at Gladstone Port.

A classic battle is taking shape between preservationists wishing to continue protecting the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and local and national government figures seeking to expand industrial activity at the Port of Gladstone. The onset of fracking activities in nearby natural gas fields has led to a desire to establish a liquid natural gas (LNG) export platform at Gladstone. This new facility, together with existing industrial facilities such as an aluminum smelter, put the protected Barrier Reef and the species that depend on it in extreme danger.

The Great Barrier Reef is located within a World Heritage Area roughly the size of Italy off of the Eastern Australian Coast. It was listed as a heritage site because of its incredibly diverse coral reefs, unique seagrass habitats and rare marine species. Even so, the harbor is continuing what is now the biggest dredging operation ever approved in Australia. Beginning in 2014, giant ships will load LNG to export to Asia. To make matters worse, the harbour at Gladstone already hosts an aluminium smelter and a coal export terminal.

Worries over the impact of the harbor’s rapid industrial development have mobilized environmental advocates and UNESCO representatives. The United Nations has recently concluded a fact-finding mission and is scheduled to issue a report at the end of June. Earlier in April, veterinary scientists reported mud crabs, fish and other marine animals have already erupted in lesions, red spots and are displaying general signs of sickness, confirming that marine life will surely suffer if industrial operations are allowed to expand. The ray of hope is that Australian government officials have, to date, displayed a highly cavalier attitude towards the concerns expressed by environmental advocates and historic preservationists.

Sign the petition below to urge Australia to take responsibility for the marine life and World Heritage Sites in their possession and halt the construction of the highly destructive LNG export platform at Gladstone Port.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Leo Zussino,

The proposed establishment of a liquid natural gas (LNG) export platform at Gladstone, together with existing industrial facilities such as an aluminum smelter, put the protected Great Barrier Reef and the marine species that depend on it in extreme danger.

The Great Barrier Reef is located within a World Heritage Area roughly the size of Italy off of the Eastern Australian Coast. It was listed as a heritage site because of its incredibly diverse coral reefs, unique seagrass habitats and rare marine species. Additionally, the Great Barrier Reef is located within a World Heritage Area roughly the size of Italy that has no equivalent anywhere else in the world.

The environmental impact of the harbor’s rapid industrial development has already proven to have disastrous consequences for marine life, damaging the country’s seafood business and tourism. Earlier in April, veterinary scientists reported mud crabs, fish and other marine animals have already erupted in lesions, red spots and are displaying general signs of sickness, confirming that marine life will surely suffer if industrial operations are allowed to expand.

Australia must take responsibility for the marine life and World Heritage Sites in their possession. I strongly urge you to halt the construction of the highly destructive LNG export platform at Gladstone Port.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

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316 Signatures

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