Applaud Australia for Creating the World’s Largest Marine Reserve

protected coral in coral sea

Target: Australia’s Environment Minister, Tony Burke

Goal: Thank Australia for being a leader in marine conservation and encourage them to effectively enforce the new protection measures.

Australia’s Gillard government has recently announced that after much consideration, it has decided to create the world’s largest marine reserve in the Coral Sea, including the world’s second largest highly protected zone. This decision marks a historic moment for protecting our marine wildlife in Australia and globally. Thank Australia’s leaders for being an example in ocean conservation and encourage them to effectively enforce new protection measures.

The proposed Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve originally fell short of a real conservation effort, as it left 90% of the region’s coral reefs unprotected. After environmental advocates pushed for greater coral reef protection, the government revisited their plan. Now, almost all of the Coral Sea Marine Reserve will be protected from destructive trawling and mining, including oil and gas exploration and development. Environmental Minister Tony Burke also replied to the public by increasing the number of protected reefs from 2 to 7.

While the measure is a giant step forward for marine conservation, there are still a number of gaps that must eventually be addressed. 18 reefs are still unprotected, fishing is still allowed up to 60 meters of the reef surface, meaning many big fish that patrol the reef edges like sharks can still be caught, and longline fishing is still allowed in the southern portion of the Coral Sea. Overall, Australia’s decision to establish a marine national park the size of Spain is monumental and a welcome sign that government leaders are listening to sound science.

Sign the petition below to thank Australia for being a leader in marine conservation and encourage them to effectively enforce the new protection measures. The signatures will be delivered during the government’s upcoming public consultation period on the Coral Sea Marine Reserve.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Environmental Minister Tony Burke,

I am writing to commend you for listening to environmental scientists and public concerns regarding the Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve. Your decision to create the world’s largest marine reserve in the Coral Sea, including the world’s second largest highly protected zone, marks a historic moment for protecting our marine wildlife in Australia and globally.

While the measure is a giant step forward for marine conservation, there are still a number of gaps that must be addressed. 18 reefs are still unprotected, fishing is still allowed up to 60 meters of the reef surface, meaning many big fish that patrol the reef edges like sharks can still be caught, and longline fishing is still allowed in the southern portion of the Coral Sea. Overall, however, the proposed system of zoning is a long-awaited piece of legislation that will hopefully restore the Coral Sea to vibrant health.

Finally, I urge you to effectively enforce the new protection measures and provide the public education needed to make the cultural and social changes that will lead to lasting conservation. Thank you for being an international leader in marine conservation.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Sign the Petition

  • Only your name will be displayed. By signing, you accept our terms and may receive updates on this and related causes.
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One Comment

  1. fishing, mining, shipping, but as-we-go ~
    eutrophication and cases of vibrio ~
    climate regime shift ~
    biosphere-biota rift ~
    resourceful? remorseful?
    protégé today you know !

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187 Signatures

  • Eric von Borstel
  • Muhammad Kamal
  • Mal Gaff
  • Hermann Kastner
  • sheila childs
  • joan walker
  • jeff hopkins
  • Holly Hall
  • Rebecca Williams
  • Terrie Phenicie
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