Don’t Deport Honest, Hard Working Immigrants

Dreamers

Target: U.S. Congress

Goal: Ensure honest and hardworking, yet undocumented immigrants, are permitted to pursue the American Dream.

The Obama administration recently suspended all deportations of undocumented immigrants who have no criminal record, have been in the country since a young age, and either attend college or serve in the military. These undocumented immigrants are the very same people who would be eligible for fast-tracked citizenship under the DREAM Act. In addition to not being deported, these individuals will be granted work permits, allowing them to work within the United States legally.

The Dream Act would be very beneficial not only to the lives of those currently living in the United States without legal documentation but to the country as a whole. When productive member of society – as those who fall under the DREAM Act have proven themselves to be through school or public service – are given the chance to obtain citizenship, everybody benefits: The United States get skilled individuals to bolster society, and the DREAM candidates get to live the American dream. These results are far preferable to the alternative, where skilled individuals either get forced into exploitative work or become embroiled in criminal enterprises.

With the new Obama administration deportation standards, those who would qualify for the DREAM Act citizenship will be allowed to stay in the country while living in a legal borderland: they would neither have citizenship, nor would they be susceptible to deportation. As those eligible for the DREAM Act are already going to be allowed to stay in the country, there is no downside to passing a permanent federal DREAM Act.

Sign this petition to signal your support of a federal DREAM Act, giving all who are currently living in a legal limbo permanent citizenship. By making permanent, as well as adding to, the Obama administration’s immigration policy, we can ensure that skilled, intelligent and law-abiding undocumented immigrants are finally allowed to become full members of American society.

PETITION LETTER

Dear United States Congress,

Recently, the Obama administration used its executive powers to halt the deportations of undocumented individuals who would fall under the DREAM Act. These undocumented residents will soon obtain legal status within the United States, as well as work papers, but they will still remain in a legal limbo between citizen and undocumented immigrant. As the policy change by the Obama administration will soon give these individuals a legal way to remain in the country, there is no downside to passing a federal DREAM Act and finally giving these people a path towards citizenship.

The passing of the DREAM Act would allow skilled individuals to remain in the country and would benefit both these undocumented residents as well as the country as a whole. While not currently citizens, those who would benefit from the DREAM Act have proven their value as productive and law-abiding members of society; these people can be productive members of society, particularly if they are granted full citizenship and the opportunity that comes with it.

I, as well as everybody else who signed this petition, implore you in the federal legislature to build upon the executive branch’s start towards full citizenship for undocumented residents. There is no downside to this course of action, but there are numerous, concrete, benefits for productive undocumented residents as well as society as a whole.

Sincerely,
[Your Name Here]

Sign the Petition

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78 Signatures

  • Hermann Kastner
  • Trista Russell
  • Eric von Borstel
  • Mal Gaff
  • Terrie Phenicie
  • Holly Hall
  • Jutta Taraniuk
  • Melanie waleski
  • Ricki Newman
  • sundriya grubb
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