Demand Apple Stop Preventing Fair Repair Acts

Target: Tim Cook, CEO of Apple

Goal: Stop preventing “Fair Repair Acts” and make Apple products easier for customers to repair by themselves.

New York state is considering a Fair Repair Act that would require manufacturers to sell replacement parts to consumers and prevent manufacturers from stopping users from fixing their own devices, much to Apple’s chagrin. The company has been lobbying against these efforts and similar ones being considered across the country since at least 2015, and is hurting consumers and the environment in the process. The phones, tablets, and computers Apple sells have a huge ecological footprint, requiring lots of raw materials and energy, and being able to fix one’s own phone would go a long way toward cutting down on the rampant consumerism and electronic waste that degrade our natural environments. Apple needs to know that these self-interested, environmentally-destructive lobbying efforts are unacceptable, and that consumers want easily repairable devices that the company can take pride in for more than a couple years.

Consumption has an inherent impact on the earth, and rapid consumption only increases the pace of environmental degradation, so products that last longer and can be repaired rather than replaced will be an important part of our shared sustainable future. When companies like Apple lobby against efforts to make products easily repairable, they do so out of fear of lost profits — it is not in the company’s best interest to make products that last a long time because then they can only sell so many. What’s worse is that when electronic devices are no longer useful, they often find themselves in landfills or hazardous salvage sites instead of proper recycling facilities, and the valuable materials and the energy used to make them go to waste. Sign this petition to demand Apple clean up its act and instead of spending money on hurting consumers, invest in designing quality products that are built to last, not break.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Cook,

“Fair repair” legislation requiring manufacturers to make their products easier to be fixed by consumers has been cropping up all over the United States, but recent reports indicate that your company is trying fight these efforts in places like New York rather than support them. I understand that doing so is in the company’s best short-term economic interests, but lobbying against “fair repair” is hurting consumers and very environmentally damaging. I write to you today to ask that you cease these efforts and instead invest in making your devices with longevity and repairability in mind to benefit your customers and the planet.

Designing your products to be replaced every couple of years and making repairs much more difficult than necessary may be profitable for Apple, but customers are hurt by the resulting more expensive and poorer quality devices, and the planet suffers from the mountains of electronic waste from broken or obsolete products. These often end up in landfills, where the component materials go to waste and contribute to toxic leaching, or are improperly recycled in developing nations with few protections for workers exposed to hazardous chemicals. I encourage you to shirk this disastrous status quo, and rather than spending money on harmful lobbying, invest your profits in designing high quality devices that last a long time and can be easily repaired by consumers if something goes wrong. You have committed Apple to environmental stewardship in the past, now it’s time to show you really mean it.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Matias Cruz

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One Comment

  1. Gen Lovyet Agustsson says:

    make products more recyclable!

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