Reduce Carbon Emissions by Requiring Power Plants Use Low Carbon Energy Sources to Generate Electricity

Target: U.S. Senate

Goal: Set a national standard to reduce carbon emissions by requiring power plants to increase the amount of low carbon energy sources used to generate electricity.

Power plants are responsible for the majority of carbon emissions in the United States. The Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 would reduce carbon emissions by requiring that large utilities supply increasing amounts of electricity from low carbon sources. Beginning in 2015 power plants would be required to generate 24% of electricity from low carbon sources such as wind, solar, nuclear, and natural gas. The amount would increase 3% per year until 2035 when 84% of electricity would come from low carbon sources. The change would reduce carbon emissions from power plants by 20% in 2025 and by 40% in 2035. Electric power generation contributes almost 40% of all carbon dioxide emission in the United States; therefore reducing it will significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions and global warming.

Global warming is a threat to human survival and should be stopped. Greenhouse gas emissions cause global warming by increasing the earth’s temperature. Even a small change in earth’s temperature can have a devastating effect on the environment. Higher temperatures can cause extreme weather and result in rising sea levels. Extreme weather can cause deaths through flooding and droughts. Rising sea levels will flood coastal communities. Climate change is already happening, but the speed at which it occurs can be reduced. Carbon dioxide is the most common greenhouse gas thus reducing carbon dioxide emission will reduce global warming.

By signing the petition below you will help urge the U.S. Senate to reduce carbon emissions by passing legislation to require power plants to use low carbon energy sources to generate electricity.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear U.S. Senate,

Carbon dioxide emissions are responsible for global warming. Power plants emit more carbon dioxide than any other sector in the United States. The Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 would reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by requiring they use low carbon energy sources to generate electricity. Beginning in 2015 large utilities would be required to generate 24% of their electricity from low carbon sources. Power plants would need to increase the amount of power generated from low carbon sources by 3% per year until they reach 84% in 2035. The change would result in a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2025 and a 40% reduction in 2035. Reducing carbon dioxide emissions is critical to stop climate change.

Global warming is a threat to human survival and the environment. Greenhouse gas emissions cause earth’s temperature to rise which results in climate change. Even a few degrees increase in global temperatures can have devastating effects on humans and the environment. Global warming causes extreme weather which can result in deaths from storms. Long term effects of a climate change can include droughts which can reduce food supply. Climate change is already happening, but it is not too late to stop it. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is critical to stop climate change. Carbon dioxide emissions make up the majority of greenhouse gas emissions; therefore reducing carbon dioxide emissions would slow climate change. The Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 is an important step in reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

I urge you to support the Clean Energy Standards Act of 2012 to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by increasing the use of low carbon energy sources for electricity generation.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Sign the Petition

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176 Signatures

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