United Airlines: Stop Policing Women’s Clothing

Target: United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz

Goal: Change outdated, sexist dress code that targets women for wearing ordinary clothing.

On Sunday March 26th, two teenage girls were prevented from boarding a United Airlines flight. Their crime? Wearing leggings, an item of clothing the company’s dress code deems inappropriate. After the teenagers were turned away, a ten-year-old girl travelling with them covered her own leggings with a dress before being allowed on the plane, whilst the girls’ father was allowed on without any interference despite wearing shorts that ended inches above his knees.

After the incident was reported on Twitter by a fellow passenger, the airline faced a firestorm of criticism on social media, with customers, commentators, and even several celebrities voicing their outrage. Despite this, they continue to defend their actions, pointing out that the girls were subject to stricter regulations than standard passengers because they were flying on special discounted tickets for friends and family of employees. They also denied that the clothing requirements are sexist, arguing that they apply equally to men and women.

But many remain unconvinced by this argument and say that, although the rules apply to men as well, they’re mostly concerned with items of clothing primarily worn by women such as miniskirts, leggings, and midriff-displaying tops. This discriminatory focus works to sexualize women’s bodies whilst policing their clothing choices and unfairly presenting everyday outfits as inappropriate. Sign this petition and show United Airlines that their dress code is outmoded and sexist and needs to change.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Munoz,

On Sunday March 26th, you denied two teenage girls access to their flight from Denver International Airport because they were wearing leggings, an item of clothing your company considered to be inappropriate. An eyewitness account says the girls were distressed by this public policing of their clothing choices and I call on you to address your policies and ensure that incidents like this do not happen again.

From your response to the controversy surrounding this case, I understand that the girls were travelling with discounted tickets given to friends and family of employees and that these tickets come with a more severe dress code. However, whilst I respect your right to place restrictions on the clothing choices of employees and their associates, your current dress code is outmoded and sexist. Placing an undue focus on items of clothing most commonly worn by women and girls works to sexualize their bodies and police their clothing choices in a manner that truly is inappropriate.

Like the many commentators on social media, I call on you to address these concerns and revise your dress code so that it no longer unfairly targets women and girls.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Sonia Grases

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9 Comments

  1. Kathryn Irby says:

    I will never, ever fly United Airlines again!!! You people have lost your frigging minds!!

  2. Gen Lovyet Agustsson says:

    clothes are not a crime!

  3. Gillian Miller Gillian Miller says:

    Better than being battered and dragged out of a plane because they want to send staff elsewhere. If you stop someone boarding because you want to send staff somewhere then, not OK but fair enough. To force people off of a plane once they have boarded and sat down is another. I have never seen such an abusive use of power as well as causing injuries.

    I have flown with American based airlines and will never do so again, American Airlines were no better. I understand that they have a really good customer service department, shame that they don’t use it for their passengers/customers.

  4. Maegan M Geleta says:

    I understand a dress code for employees. How dare the airline force a dress code on customers? Has the airline decided it wants to be forced out of business? They go from bad course of action to worse decision. What is wrong with them?

    • I agree with you. I may be an employee and have a dress code but that shouldn’t apply to my wife or kids unless it is obvious that they are representing my company. Of course United will simply beat them into submission! The best airline I ever flew on was Piedmont Airlines…great small firm that sold out to American, if I remember correctly.

  5. Boycotting American Airlines. I will NEVER fly with them again. As a woman I do not take this attack against us kindly. They truly are going down. I guess they are making their bed and now they will lose and lie in it. Have fun United Airlines, CEO Oscar Munoz. You just can’t help yourself getting on that hate bus. What a shame.

  6. Selena Brooks says:

    You are enforcing a dress code then you need to ENFORCE your employees to be more compassionate professionals and not freaking RUDE ASSES. You do not know what situation someone is going through when they have to fly. Oscar Munoz it’s not about United Airlines and your employees have you heard ” The Customer Is Always Right ” BOYCOTTING UNITED AIRLINES!!!

  7. Wendy Morrison says:

    As long as you are NOT boarding a plane in you birthday suit–butt naked or NOT just wearing any type of undergarments the AIRLINES SHOULD NEVER SET REGULATIONS TO THEIR PASSENGERS CLOTHING!!

  8. United Airlines CEO OSCAR MUNOZ:

    WOW!!!!!!!!!! Oscar is very busy and popular these days!!!

    1. Last month (March 26, 2017), two girls were barred from a flight because they were wearing leggings,
    2. A few days ago (April 9, 2017), “policemen” dragged a man from his seat aboard a Sunday night flight at O’Hare International Airport.

    READ MORE
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/10/business/united-flight-passenger-dragged.html?_r=0

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