Protect A Culturally Important Mountain in Montana

Target:  National Register of Historic Places

Goal:  Protect a tribal peak in Montana from the mining industry.

Canadian mining firm Revett Minerals is planning to mine copper and silver near Chicago Peak in Montana. Chicago Peak is a culturally historic and significant site for the Salish and Kootenai tribes. The peak does lie within a federally protected area which cannot be logged or mined. However, Revett Minerals was able to gain approval for the project because the minerals were identified before the 1964 Wilderness Act. This unfortunate loophole means the only hope of preserving the peak from destructive mining practices is to have it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Revett Minerals plans to tunnel under the protected lands to reach the copper and silver beneath the base of Chicago Peak.

Mining is environmentally destructive, contaminating water supplies and destroying habitat. In the case of Montana’s Chicago Peak there is the addition of its cultural significance. For the Salish and Kootenai tribes it is a sacred site for praying and fasting. It is also one of the last untouched places for these tribes to connect with their cultural heritage. There is already a copper and silver mine, also run by Revett Minerals, nearby. However, that site does not produce as much as is projected for the Chicago Peak site. It is time to put profits aside and preserve one of the only remaining places of historical significance to the Native American tribes in the area.

Revett Minerals is looking to profit from Chicago Peak at the expense of the Salish and Kootenai tribes. This peak must be listed on the National Register of Historic Places in order to preserve the untouched nature of the peak for generations to come.

PETITION LETTER

Dear National Register of Historic Places,

Revett Minerals, a Canadian mining firm, has plans to open a $300 million copper and silver mine near Chicago Peak in Montana. Chicago Peak is a sacred site with cultural and historical significance for the Salish and Kootenai tribes. The peak does lie within a federally protected area which cannot be logged or mined. However, Revett Minerals was able to gain approval for the project because the minerals were identified before the 1964 Wilderness Act. This loophole means the only hope of preserving the peak from destructive mining practices is to have it listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Mining is environmentally destructive, contaminating water supplies and destroying habitat. In the case of Montana’s Chicago Peak there is the addition of its cultural significance. For the Salish and Kootenai tribes it is a sacred site often used for praying and fasting. It is also one of the last untouched places for these tribes to connect with their cultural heritage. There is already a copper and silver mine, also run by Revett Minerals, nearby. However, that site does not produce as much as is projected for the Chicago Peak site. It is time to put profits aside and preserve one of the only remaining places of historical significance to the Native American tribes in the area.

Revett Minerals is looking to profit from Chicago Peak at the expense of the Salish and Kootenai tribes. Please list this peak on the National Register of Historic Places in order to preserve the untouched nature of the peak for generations to come.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

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2 Comments

  1. We must preserve what little wilderness remains.

  2. Dietrich Schwaegerl says:

    Stop this assault on nature friendly cultures!
    What would Christians say if other ones intended to destroy churches just in order to rob materials!

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