Protect The Grand Canyon And Support A Ban On New Uranium Mining

Target:  Uranium Industry

Goal:  Support a ban on new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon, an awe inspiring natural treasure, home to countless plants and animals, is being threatened by uranium mining. In January, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued a ban on new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon. The mining industry, however, is striking back by filing a lawsuit to reverse the ban. They claim the environmental analysis report was inadequate and they should be able to mine for uranium. They are supported by the Nuclear Energy Institute and the National Mining Association. Also striking back are the Havasupai Tribe, Grand Canyon Trust, and numerous environmental organizations with a legal intervention to uphold the ban. Pollution from uranium mining already taking place near the Grand Canyon is enough without further mining operations beginning. The ban on new mining must be upheld for the sake of the Grand Canyon’s future.

The threat of new uranium mining has serious consequences for the natural ecosystem of the region, as well as water from the Colorado river that three states rely on. Water utilities are against new mining. New uranium mining would mean much higher pollution levels and possible depletion of aquifers. Uranium levels could reach twice the EPA limit for drinking water.

If the ban on new mining were overturned, it is estimated that more than 25 new uranium mines would be developed and over 700 exploration sites would be set up. This would astronomically impact the environment by taking up over 1,300 acres of land and consuming 316 million gallons of water. The effect on wildlife and native American lands would be devastating.

Destructive uranium mining already impacts the Grand Canyon region. The department of the interior did the right thing by banning new uranium mining. This ban must be upheld. By signing this petition you are asking the uranium industry to drop their lawsuit to reverse the ban.

PETITION LETTER

Dear Gregory Yount Manager at The Northern Arizona Uranium Project,

New uranium mining is threatening the Grand Canyon and the surrounding ecosystem. In January, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar issued a 20 year ban on new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon. The Havasupai Tribe, Grand Canyon Trust, and numerous environmental groups support that ban and are ready to fight back in court. And, for good reason. Further uranium mining in the region threatens wildlife, water supplies and sacred land for native Americans. The ban must be upheld for the sake of the Grand Canyon region’s future.

The threat of new uranium mining has serious consequences for the natural ecosystem of the region, as well as water from the Colorado river that three states rely on. Water utilities are against new mining. New uranium mining would mean much higher pollution levels and possible depletion of aquifers. Uranium levels could reach twice the EPA limit for drinking water.

If the ban on new mining were overturned, it is estimated that more than 25 new uranium mines would be developed and over 700 exploration sites would be set up. This would astronomically impact the environment by taking up over 1,300 acres of land and consuming 316 million gallons of water. The effect on wildlife and native American lands would be devastating.

Uranium mines already impact the region. By stopping new mining precious natural resources are spared. Please drop the law suit to reverse the ban on new uranium mining put in place by the department of the interior.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Sign the Petition

  • Only your name will be displayed. By signing, you accept our terms and may receive updates on this and related causes.
FacebookCare2 NewsTwitterEmailShare

2 Comments

  1. Please do not send individual email petitions to my email address. They will be treated like SPAM. Instead, please send a total of petitions and a geographic break down of where they are from.

    I will withdraw my lawsuit for 20 million dollars, which is the minimum economic loss that I would have for not developing my mining claims.

    My suit is simple, Secretary Salazar’s withdrawal is unconstitutionally based, and is unsupported by the FEIS. The FEIS is unlawful in that it does not comply with NEPA.

    The basis for your petition is fabricated. The FEIS found that the effects from mining breccia pipes for uranium to be negligible. 25 X negligible is still negligible.

    1500 acres mined to provide the engergy to power a city the size of LA for 80 years seems very worth while.

    Why don’t you petition the Navajo to stop mining coal at Kayenta and then shut down the polluting Navajo Generating station instead.

    The energy in the uranium that has been withdrawn represents a coal mine 80 square miles strip mined to a depth of 300 feet. That is 51,200 acres mined to a depth of 300 feet. I think 1300 acres that will be restored to premining conditions is worth it, especially when the dire affects you present above are fictional.

    Gregory Yount

  2. Danika Garcia Danika Garcia says:

    How petitions are disseminated from this website is not under my control. I appreciate the details of your comment. I believe the bigger picture is moving away from non-renewable sources of energy with potential negative effects towards sustainable forms of energy with a lower environmental impact, as well as informing and educating the public on events taking place that could affect them or the area they live in. Now, people can judge for themselves based on differing information. I am also by no means against petitioning against native American tribes if they are engaging in environmentally detrimental activities.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Facebook Comments

comments

73 Signatures

  • Lea Faulks
  • Carri Welsh
  • Nikki Owen
  • Nikki Owen
  • Nitzan Steiman
  • Ana Maria Mainhardt Carpes
  • Darlene Roepke
  • Eveline Mutsaerts
  • Lynn Juozilaitis
  • Richard Ohlendorf
1 of 7123...7
Skip to toolbar