Prevent Dam From Destroying Home of Indigenous People

Itaituba PA - 26.11.2014 - Ativistas do Greenpeace e índios Mundukuru usam pedras para formar a frase "Tapajós Livre" nas areias de uma praia às margens do rio de mesmo nome, próximo ao município de Itaituba, no Pará. O protesto, que contou com a participação de cerca de 60 Munduruku, ocorreu na região onde o governo pretende construir a primeira de uma série de cinco hidrelétricas na bacia do Tapajós. “O Brasil insiste em seu plano de barrar os grandes rios da Amazônia, ignorando os alertas do clima e negando o direito de consulta prévia, livre e informada aos povos tradicionais da região, que terão seu modo de vida afetado de forma irreversível por essas obras", disse Danicley de Aguiar, da campanha Amazônia do Greenpeace. Foto Greenpeace/Bruno Kelly.

Target: Luciano de Meneses Evaristo, Director of Environmental Protection for the Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources

Goal: Permanently stop construction of the São Luiz do Tapajós dam on indigenous lands in Brazil.

The Tapajós River basin, an area of extraordinary biodiversity as well as the home of the indigenous Munduruku people, is currently at risk of destruction. If completed, the São Luiz do Tapajós dam will be Brazil’s second-largest hydroelectric dam and will flood 729 square kilometers of delicate rainforest.

The indigenous Munduruku people have fought tooth and nail to prevent the dam from destroying their ancestral homeland, calling upon Brazilian and international companies to withdraw support for the dam. The Munduruku have successfully turned this project into a cornerstone of the worldwide environmental and indigenous rights fight, working with Greenpeace Brazil to create an unofficial demarcation of their territories. The Brazilian Indigenous Rights Agency has tentatively acknowledged this land as belonging to the Munduruku, an important step toward official recognition and protection.

The construction of the São Luiz do Tapajós dam is completely contrary to the Munduruku people’s desire to maintain their traditional lands and lives. It would destroy a large portion of their land and displace three villages. The Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA) has temporarily suspended construction of the dam due to these concerns. While this has given the Munduruku people more time to gather support, it is far from a permanent solution. IBAMA must completely outlaw the construction of the dam and any future dams in this region.

It’s estimated that the São Luiz do Tapajós dam and its corresponding infrastructure would result in 2200 square kimometers of deforestation. Beyond the cultural value of the land, this is a region of enormous biodiversity and ecological importance. The dam would disrupt waterways and affect the migration routes of the fish that rely on the river. Further, the area that would be flooded by the dam is a key nesting site for native macaws and other bird species.

IBAMA must respect the rights of the Munduruku people by preserving the biodiversity and integrity of their lands. Sign the petition below to encourage the organization to completely outlaw the construction of the São Luiz do Tapajós dam and any future dams in the area.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Luciano de Meneses Evaristo,

The Munduruku people have been fighting for decades for official recognition and protection of their ancestral lands. These lands have been threatened by deforestation, pollution, and most recently, the São Luiz do Tapajós dam project. This dam would flood the Tapajós River basin and destroy much of the region’s biodiversity.

As the Munduruku work towards more official recognition of their rights, they seek cooperation from the Brazilian government in order to protect their lands. IBAMA has the responsibility to listen to concerns from both environmentalists and indigenous people and permanently stop dam construction.

The São Luiz do Tapajós dam is the first of five dams planned on the Tapajós River, each of which would irreversibly destroy the stunning Tapajós River basin and the Munduruku communities that reside there. IBAMA must not allow these dams to be built.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: Bruno Kelly

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6 Comments

  1. Jennifer Hayes says:

    There’s too much at stake here. the more trees we lose the higher the water level, the more ‘natural’ deforestation and ultimately global warming as well as indiginous peoples losing their livelihoods and their homes. Far too much at stake.

  2. Why must modern man always insist on destroying everything we touch?

  3. Disrespect for people and the environment seems to be an epidemic disease in politicians internationally. Thus – dear Sir, please be outstanding and show that you are different, show your commitment toward a positive future. Dams & coal are old energy. Go solar – you have so much of it!

  4. “The human appetite for animal flesh is a driving force behind virtually every major category of environmental damage now threatening the human future – deforestation, erosion, fresh water scarcity, air and water pollution, climate change, biodiversity loss, social injustice, the destabilization of communities and the spread of disease.” — The World Watch Institute

    http://www.cowspiracy.com/

  5. Julie Bates says:

    We destroyed the First Nations people….haven’t we learned anything from this….damn the goddam $$$$$$ it’s pathetic GREED……shame shame shame.

  6. Lisa Zarafonetis Lisa Zarafonetis says:

    Signed & Shared❗️😠

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