Stop Blocking Life-Saving Drug for Addicted People

Heroin Addiction

Target: Maine Governor Paul LePage

Goal: Stop blocking attempts to make anti-overdose drug available to people addicted to heroin.

People suffering from addiction to opiates won’t be allowed easy access to a drug that stops overdose thanks to a veto of a bill by the Governor of Maine.  The bill would have let pharmacists dispense the medication naloxone, which works by blocking opiate receptors in the brain, making drugs like heroin instantly ineffective. It’s used by emergency medical technicians to save the lives of people who have overdosed on drugs.

Governor LePage justified his veto by saying that allowing people suffering from addiction, which is a mental illness, access to drugs that stop overdose, it would allow them to overdose whenever they want. “Creating a situation where an addict has a heroin needle in one hand and a shot of naloxone in the other produces a sense of normalcy and security around heroin use that serves only to perpetuate the cycle of addiction,” he wrote in the veto letter.

What LePage doesn’t understand is how naloxone works. The medication blocks all opiates from working at all, instantly producing severe withdrawal symptoms, which are extremely unpleasant. Nobody would use naloxone lightly.

More importantly, addicted persons don’t deserve a death sentence for having an addiction. The threat of overdose does not deter people from taking drugs, it just kills them. Sign our petition to denounce Governor LePage for vetoing this life-saving bill and demand he approves any like it in the future.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Governor LePage,

I understand that you recently vetoed a bill that would have allowed pharmacists to dispense naloxone, a life-saving drug that stops the effects of opiate overdose. You apparently think that this would perpetuate addiction by letting people addicted to heroin to run around with “a heroin needle in one hand and a shot of naloxone in the other.”

What you don’t seem to understand is that naloxone blocks opiate receptors in the brain, producing instant, intense withdrawal symptoms in a person addicted to heroin. Therefore, addicted persons who had access to naloxone would still have a serious incentive not to have to use it.

The threat of overdose clearly does not deter addicted people from using drugs like heroin. This is because drug addiction is a mental illness. Addicted persons need to be treated, not condemned to death for something they can’t control. If you care anything for people who are suffering from addiction, you’ll apologize for vetoing this bill that could have saved lives and pledged to approve any others like it that come along.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: Jordi Bernabeu Farrús

Sign the Petition

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One Comment

  1. I don’t sign for sure. They have an addiction they are weak on their will and stupid to start the thing. Today are to many ways to help this kind of shit people. If they don’t respect their own body they should die as soon as possible and my only sorrow is that any vice even tabaco, doesn’t kill in about 1 year. The other vices alchol&drugs is proved that they wrecked and destroy any one living with them, they constantly put in danger anyone in their way, so what the point??? to make others suffer to save one??? To destroy mentality others and physically? Enough of this BS. The world has to many sick people because of the BS is human being. We are not in extinction we are to many. The ones who committed certain crimes against animals any crime, against people rapists, paedophiles, psychopaths, violent robbers all death penalty and in 1 month, this drug addicts should never get any help and just let them die, as soon as he better.

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