End Pointless Killing of Endangered Fin Whale

Hvalfjšrour, ICELAND
An endangered Fin Whale, harpooned yesterday is brought to the harbor of Hvalfjšrour, Iceland. The Fin whale is the first kill by Iceland and marks the resumption to commercial whaling for the country. Greenpeace condemns the act of the killing an endangered Fin whale as "a senseless waste" arguing that there is no economic or scientific justification for the hunt.
©2006 Greenpeace/ Ragnar Axelsson

Target: Sigrún Magnúsdóttir, Iceland’s Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources

Goal: Stop killing endangered fin whales in Iceland.

Iceland hunts whales for commercial gain and defies the International Whaling Commission (IWC) by hunting medium and large whales for profit, including the endangered fin whale. Icelandic whalers kill the fin whale using harpoons that first penetrate and then explode. This inhumane practice must be stopped to protect this suffering species.

Fin whales are the second largest mammal on the planet, after blue whales, and are only hunted by Iceland. Every year, the Icelandic government establishes the “sustainable” kill numbers for minke and endangered fin whales. The government ignores the IWC’s 46 fin whale “sustainable” kill limit and, instead, allows a quota of 154 fin whales to be killed each year.

Unfortunately, according to the documentary “Breach,” Iceland’s population is simply not educated on the importance of protecting their whales. In fact, they are convinced by one corporation, Hvalur, that killing these whales is a proud and nationalistic Iceland tradition. Despite fin whale meat being unpopular, Hvalur still continues to try and sell its product to Japan and has even tried to cut their huge economic losses by adding whale to beer and dog food. We need to act now and tell Iceland to stop Hvalur and similar companies from killing the precious and endangered fin whale.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Minister Magnúsdóttir,

Every year, tourists from around the world flock to Iceland to admire the unmatched beauty. One of the principle attractions is whale watching, where tourists can see wildlife like the fin whale, the second largest mammal in the world. Unfortunately, however, the fin whale is endangered and Iceland is failing to protect it.

It is sad to admit that Iceland’s whaling industry is to blame for shamelessly killing this incredible animal. Killing fin whales has no profitable economic justification nor is it a favored food resource for locals or tourists. Iceland’s Ministry for the Environment and Natural Resources has a responsibility to end the purposeless whaling done by companies like Hvalur that only kill the whales to pursue failing economic gains.

The fin whale is an irreplaceable asset to Iceland’s environment. I demand that you take action against Hvalur and similar companies to stop whaling to protect the endangered fin whale before it’s too late.

Sincerely,

[Your name here]

Photo Credit: Ragnar Axelsson

Sign the Petition

  • Only your name will be displayed. You can edit your auto-fill information here. By signing, you accept our terms and may receive updates on this and related causes.
FacebookCare2 NewsTwitterEmailShare

3 Comments

  1. People should not be killing whales with no point to it at all! Whales are our friends, our family. They are stunning creatures and it makes me sick to think of them being killed! They deserve better. EARTH deserves better. There’s a point to that at least.

  2. Shelli Schmidt says:

    How does anyone kill such a gentle mammal, i can’t fathom what kind of person does that?! Thanks Anna S/N

  3. Another lack of regard for God’s Glorious Creation. So much evil in this world. This will come to an end. Jesus Comes Soon!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Facebook Comments

comments

702 Signatures

  • ORPHA DESS WILSON
  • Karina Salazar
  • Janet Delaney
  • Yaedi Ignatow
  • Chris Verhaegen
  • sheila childs
  • joan walker
  • Gertie Hunt
  • Holly Hall
  • PAUL FRANCIS WALKER
1 of 70123...70
Skip to toolbar