Don’t Allow the Public to Unknowingly Fund the Slaughter of Wolves

wolf

Target: Jeff Hagener, Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks Director

Goal: Ensure that money raised from “wolf stamp” fundraising project is not used to kill wolves

Government representatives in Montana are considering the introduction of a “wolf stamp” in an effort to raise funds for wolf-related programs managed by the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. However, the current wording of the proposition would allow for the public to unknowingly fund the slaughter of wolves.

If introduced correctly, the wolf stamp offers a much-needed fundraising opportunity for the financially limited Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The public would have an easy, convenient method of donating funds toward vital wolf conservation programs that benefit wolves throughout the state. It would allow department officials more flexibility and reach in their conservation programs, giving them greater incentive to manage wolves responsibly, according to the Endangered Species Coalition.

Unfortunately, the current wording of the proposal does not guarantee that funds raised from the sale of wolf stamps will go toward the protection of wolves. According to the Endangered Species Coalition, the department currently has many “lethal wolf control measures” in the majority of the state, including quota-less hunting and trapping, that have the potential to receive funding through this project. If this were to happen, the general public would unknowingly help pay for the senseless slaughter of wolves while being led to believe their money is being used to protect wolves. It is vital that the proposal be reworded to clarify that public funds raised should only be used for non-lethal programs. Further, annual reporting on the use of funds should be required to guarantee public transparency. Urge the department’s director to make the necessary revisions to ensure the wolf stamp project will be used for the benefit of wolves.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Hagener,

As an animal welfare advocate, I am concerned about the recent proposal of a “wolf stamp” that would help raise funds for the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ wolf-related programs. While I applaud efforts to improve these programs, the current wording of the proposal jeopardizes the well-being of the state’s wolves.

I believe it is vital that the wording be revised to clarify that funds raised from the sale of wolf stamps would not be used for the department’s current lethal wolf control measures. While purchasing stamps is a convenient way for the general public to donate funds, it would be an injustice to allow them to believe their money is being used for conservation programs when it may instead be used to kill wolves. In addition to stipulating that funds should be used only for non-lethal wolf programs, it would also be beneficial to require annual reporting on the use of funds to guarantee transparency with the public. I urge you to make the necessary revisions and ensure the wolf stamp project fulfills its intended use of benefiting wolves throughout the state.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: Ellie Attebery via Flickr

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2 Comments

  1. Christine Stewart says:

    Pure evil. The idiot livestock ranchers need to have guard dogs or other measures to defend their livestock, instead of letting the animals wander in wolf habitat, and then slaughter the wolves after predation occurs.

  2. The wolves need to be protected. The slaughter is disgusting and cruel.

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