Increase Conservation Efforts of Indochinese Tiger

Target: Zhang Xinsheng, President of International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

Goal: Urge the IUCN to list the Indochinese tiger as critically endangered.

The Indochinese tiger is a tiger subspecies widely dispersed throughout Thailand, Cambodia, China, Myanmar, and Vietnam. It is currently listed as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). However, with fewer than 300 individuals left in the wild, Indochinese tigers are facing extinction. Call on the IUCN to change the status of the Indochinese tiger to critically endangered for increased species conservation efforts.

Currently, the key threats to Indochinese tigers are habitat fragmentation and poaching. Habitat fragmentation is a phenomenon caused by rapid human development. When transportation networks are built, roads are constructed across natural habitats, thus intersecting hunting and breeding grounds of Indochinese tigers. This fragmentation of natural habitats forces Indochinese tiger populations to scatter and spread into smaller isolated populations. Not only does habitat fragmentation reduce habitat availability, it also increases accessibility for poachers.

Existing populations of Indochinese tigers are at extreme risk from poaching. This majestic species is often hunted for its fur and other body parts that are used in Asian medicines. In Vietnam, nearly three-quarters of poached tigers are used to provide stock for Chinese pharmacies.

Indochinese tigers are apex predators at the top of their food chain. If this species continues to decline, then other animals within this food chain and fragile ecosystem will suffer as well. The Indochinese tiger is listed as an endangered species by the IUCN. However, there are still not enough conservation actions being taken to protect this species.

In Myanmar, a designated Protected Tiger Area was clear-cut for sugar and tapioca plantations. In Cambodia, timber companies continue to illegally cut down trees in tiger habitats. Unless drastic conservation measures are taken, Indochinese tiger populations will continue to spiral down toward extinction.

By signing this petition you will be encouraging the IUCN to list the Indochinese tiger as critically endangered in efforts to protect this species.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Zhang,

I would like to bring to your attention the predicament of the Indochinese tiger. This species is currently listed as endangered by the IUCN. However, with fewer than 300 individuals left in the wild, Indochinese tigers are quickly facing extinction. I would like to urge you to change the status of the Indochinese tiger to critically endangered, in efforts to increase conservation actions of this species.

As you may know, Indochinese tiger populations are threatened by habitat fragmentation, a consequence of rapid human development. When road networks are built in fragile ecosystems, natural habitats are intersected and divided up. This fragmentation forces Indochinese tiger populations to scatter into smaller isolated populations. Loss of habitat reduces a species’ chance of survival. In addition to habitat fragmentation, poaching is another threat to the Indochinese tiger. There are not enough regulations that prevent poaching from occurring, and unless stricter enforcements are put in place, Indochinese tiger populations will continue to be hunted for their fur and body parts.

Please consider listing the Indochinese tiger as critically endangered. This change in status will call for stronger conservation efforts and decrease poaching attempts.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo credit: H. Zell via Wikimedia Commons

Sign the Petition

  • Your email will not be published. By signing you accept the ForceChange terms of service and may receive updates on this and related petitions.

Facebook Comments

comments

3 Comments

  1. I am so disgusted by Chinese medicine that I feel words can’t express how I feel about it. There should be death sentences for the use of wildlife as medicine. And anyway, acceptable herbal substitutes have been found for all of the animal parts which Chinese medicine uses, so there is no excuse for their use. Therefore, their use should be punishable.

  2. Fran Fulwiler says:

    With fewer than 300 Indochinese tigers left in the wild, it is gravely important that severe penalties on tiger poaching and destruction of forests be put in place and strictly enforced, along with the classification of the Indochinese tiger as critically endangered.

  3. Pure infantile primitivism – what kind of unhumane monsters are able to handle and destroy LIVING BREATHING CREATURES in that way is unbelievable.

    HAVE YOU ALL LOST YOUR HUMANITY AND BRAIN, FERAL PERSONS RESPONSIBLE??

    People need to vote unacting authorities and officials acting irresponsibly to futuregenerations and living creatures out of occupations ONCE AND FOR ALL!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Signatures

  • Christine Christine
  • jeff hopkins
  • Jag Beveridge
  • kathy g
  • Jorden Seagers
  • WAU
  • dagmar grabsch
  • Lorraine Wardley
1 of 214123...214