Don’t Let Caribou Disappear from the United States

Target: Daniel M. Ashe, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Goal: Don’t remove endangered species protections for the woodland caribou in the United States

While they may be abundant in North American imagery and folklore, many of the continent’s most iconic species struggle daily just to keep their populations alive. One such species, the woodland caribou, is now in danger of losing protection under the Endangered Species Act despite its dangerously low numbers. The caribou once wandered freely across most of the lower 48 states. Now, its population only occupies Idaho and Washington. Pressure from an anti-environmental law firm could lead to the caribou’s removal from the endangered species list–simply because it isn’t considered significant enough to save.

When biological diversity in the United States is at more risk than ever before, declaring an entire species too unimportant to preserve seems a reckless position to take. Yet the Pacific Legal Foundation, acting on behalf of Bonners County and the Idaho State Snowmobile Association, is urging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to strip the southern Selkirk caribou population of its endangered protections entirely. Without protection, the caribou will almost certainly go extinct in the United States as logging and development continue to encroach on its habitat.

Conservationists and scientists agree that the southern Selkirk caribou population does indeed hold an essential place in the North American ecosystem. “This is the last population of caribou in the lower 48 states and certainly worthy of our care and protection,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “If it were up to the Pacific Legal Foundation, caribou, Puget Sound orcas and many other species would be allowed to go extinct in the contiguous United States simply because they also live in Canada. What if we’d said that about the bald eagle? This approach not only defies logic and the best available science, it’s also un-American.”

Urge the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to prioritize biodiversity over corporate interests. Sign the petition to save the woodland caribou today.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Daniel M. Ashe,

Recent pressure from Idaho’s Pacific Legal Foundation has led the Fish and Wildlife Service to consider removing the woodland caribou from the endangered species list. Such an act would defy environmental science and put North America’s delicate biodiversity in jeopardy. I urge you not to prioritize corporate interests when considering the caribou’s place on the endangered species list.

Without government protection, the caribou will almost certainly go extinct in the United States. While the animal once roamed throughout the majority of the lower 48 states, its population has since been constrained just to Idaho and Washington. If it loses protection under the Endangered Species Act, the woodland caribou could soon be gone forever.

Don’t let 30 years of effort to recover the woodland caribou go to waste. Continue protecting this essential species until it once again thrives in the United States.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

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2 Comments

  1. You People in the USA are so privilaged with the diversity of Large Wild Life you have. Here in NZ we do not see these animals unless we go to the Zoo and somehow it just isn’t the same. Be thankful for what you have there and take the time to look after and preserve them.

  2. Ruth Rogers Ruth Rogers says:

    Wonderful!

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