End Racial Discrimination in the Courtroom

Target: United States Congress

Goal: Reform the current criminal justice system to combat racial discrimination

Today, people of color make up 60 percent of inmates while comprising only 30 percent of U.S. population. This absurdity is not the result of behavioral disparities, contrary to the sadly common belief that black people are more prone to serious crime than other races, specifically whites.

In a recent study published by professors of Harvard, the University of Chicago, and the University of Pennsylvania, the criminal justice system is racially biased. In almost all courtrooms across the country, bias occurs whether or not the judge is admittedly affected by racial prejudice, and therefore a system must be enacted to protect the rights of minority citizens who suffer consistently worse punishments for committing the same crimes as whites.

The study was conducted using two controlled groups – one consisted of judges that displayed a low propensity towards racial bias, while the other group of judges was more likely to make sentences based on a racial stereotype. What resulted from the study was shocking. In situations where a white defendant and a black defendant had committed the same crime, the black defendant was 30 percent more likely to be imprisoned, and this was only among the first group of judges. For black defendants that were sentenced by judges who were more affected by racial bias, the rate doubled.

Because many white people believe that they do not benefit from their race, they are often blind to the covert means of racism that permeate our culture today. American media and society still tells its citizens, in the most subtle of ways, that there are significant behavioral differences between people of color and the “white majority” that sets the supposed standard of living.

Covert racism has infiltrated culture to the point that many do not realize that they themselves are the proponents of it. Racial bias is undoubtedly at work in society today, and when it results in unfair imprisonment for millions of black Americans, reform is mandatory.

Ask the United States Congress to push for reform that will make courtrooms take racial bias into consideration. It is unjust for black citizens of this country to be discriminated in the courtroom because of the color of their skin.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear United States Congress,

Racial bias affects this country in many negative ways. A recent study has proven that it even affects a judge’s decision to imprison a defendant or not. When the defendant is black, the likelihood that he or she will end up imprisoned is more than twice that of a white defendant. This truth speaks negatively about our culture’s perception of diversity, and it shows that we have allowed racial stereotypes to dictate what should be a fair and lawful place of practice: the courtroom.

I urge you to push for court reform across the nation and defend the millions of minority people that are wrongly imprisoned every year due to racial bias. Because racism and bias are often covert, many do not realize that their decisions incorporate false ideas about race, which American society has subjected to them from a young age. Judges do not possess the ability to make fair decisions when racial bias is at work, and therefore reform is mandatory. Please make the courtroom a place of justice, not a place to cultivate covert racism.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Google Images

Sign the Petition

  • Your email will not be published. By signing you accept the ForceChange terms of service and may receive updates on this and related petitions.

Facebook Comments

comments

2 Comments

  1. There most definitely needs to be reform since racism is wrong and especially in the judicial system.

  2. I had been to the court to defense myself of a wrong accusation.I have to be honest that the Judge in the Philadelphia Family court was rude. He did not allowed me to construct two whole sentences. Every time I was there I ended with an extension of a PFD. My ex wife supposed to have the representation from woman against abuse, that letter denied her representation. Her representation never handled a letter to my lawyer for me to pick up my belongings and documents. I am a Master degree graduated and granted student for the PHL at LaSalle University. This ” honorary citizen” assaulted my right to defend myself granted on the American Constitution, 4th amendment at court because I am Hispanic?? At the court room women against abuse representatives were around 3 members, and they have a Hispanic young person handcuffed sitting on the chair – one path from me. each court was as long as 8 minutes? and every time he was rude, aggressive and order giving. I grew up in the ex soviet block and I am my self from south America. I never experienced such a humiliation. My rights were not taken for consideration. My ex wife stole all my properties together with birth certificate, South American documentations and my University certificate. After 13 years living in the United stated I was welcoming with what so many representatives of our minorities face in this country. The Philadelphia lawyer took my money. I made and appointment and his co worker took the interview and made notes. He never called me to sit down and discuss what strategy I should take to defend myself and what are my rights.
    Aha? very sad, disgusting. The women against abuse named Erin never showed her face in the third court day,and I never got the letter not form my lawyer and not form her. They sponsored a thief, liar, violent and fraudulent woman.
    It left for me to believe that in the United states the judge should advocated for the rights of freedom of speech, and grant your rights. Justice is not about revenge, law is made to find balance.
    I suffer from depression, anxiety, lost many memories. I wake up in the morning, every morning and pray for God direction; so I can heel myself. every night I pray for any person in prison that his or her rights were looted because they are not white representatives of a majority

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Signatures

  • Kristey Flores McDaniel
  • Jenna Miles
  • Alper Arslan
  • Osvaldo
  • cindy wallace
  • stefan hellmann
  • Yhanna Mathews
  • Dajah Atwood
1 of 5123...5