Protect Antarctica’s Oceans From Pollution and Over-Fishing

Target:  Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources

Goal:  Protect Antarctica’s oceans from pollution and over-fishing.

Antarctica’s oceans are under threat and the Antarctic Ocean Alliance is launching a campaign of protection. This campaign includes calling for the establishment of a network of marine reserves encircling the continent. If successful, this would be the largest network of marine reserves in the world. The organization with the power to do this is the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). CCAMLR was created in 1982 and is composed of 24 nations and the European Union. The goal was to conserve and manage marine life in Antarctic waters. Antarctic waters are a meeting point for the world’s oceans and are relatively pristine, being largely untouched by human activities. However, this is changing as we see the area being affected by climate change and fishing pressures. Now is the time to tell the CCAMLR to take action and protect the oceans around Antarctica by creating marine reserves.

The oceans around Antarctica are home to approximately 10,000 species, many of which are endemic to the area. While, development, pollution, and fishing have devastated other ecosystems, the Antarctic remains relatively intact. For example, the Ross Sea is one of the most intact ecosystems on the planet, home to adelie and emperor penguins, as well as a plankton rich area that provides food for a variety of fish, seals, whales, and birds. This may not be true for long. 85% of the world’s fisheries are classified as either: exploited, fully exploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion. This means Antarctica’s species are now under pressure as fisheries move into the area. One species under pressure is the toothfish, more commonly known as the Chilean sea bass, popular in western high-end restaurants. The CCAMLR holds the power to end all environmental threats to Antarctica’s oceans by establishing what would be the largest no-take marine reserve in the world.

The future of the Antarctic ecosystem is dependent upon the establishment of a marine reserve. By signing this petition you are supporting the Antarctic Ocean Alliance in their campaign to tell the CCAMLR to create a network of no-take marine reserves in Antarctic oceans.

PETITION LETTER

Dear Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources,

Antarctica’s oceans and ecosystems are under increasing threats. The Antarctic Ocean Alliance is campaigning to encourage your organization to protect the pristine waters of Antarctica by creating a network of no-take marine reserves that would encircle the continent. The world’s oceans converge in Antarctic waters and are still relatively untouched by human activities. However, this is changing as we see the area being affected by climate change, pollution and commercial fishing pressures. Now is the time to act and protect the oceans around Antarctica.

The oceans around Antarctica are home to many endemic species with healthy populations. To ensure this remains true for future generations the Antarctic has to be protected from human impact. The Ross Sea is one of the most intact ecosystems on the planet, home to adelie and emperor penguins, as well as a plankton rich area that provides food for a variety of fish, seals, whales, and birds. This may not be true for long. 85% of the world’s fisheries are classified as either: exploited, fully exploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion. This means Antarctica’s species are now under pressure as fisheries move into the area.

Please create a no-take marine reserve in Antarctic waters. The future of the Antarctic ecosystem is dependent upon it.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

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One Comment

  1. There are steps being taken to help ensure that over-fishing of these creatures does not occur and that there
    is minimal impact to the local wildlife. They are less
    than 3 inches in size and feed primarily on phytoplankton and sea ice algae.

    The requirement that the area be free of such chemical uses for the last three
    years does not guarantee that such chemicals are not in the soil or water where the products are grown or collected.

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